Nevada Militia: ‘Control Our Borders, Not Our Ranchers’

“CONTROL OUR BORDERS! NOT OUR RANCHERS!”

One of the militia groups that moved in to defend Nevadan cattle rancher Cliven Bundy turned the conversation to illegal immigration, posting a sign that reads “CONTROL OUR BORDER! NOT OUR RANCHERS!”

Nevadan rancher Cliven Bundy won the stand-off with the Federal Bureau of Land Management this weekend, the feds choosing to stand down in fear of more bad press and violence from militia groups that have arrived to support the Bundy Ranch. Members of these groups argue that constitutional rights and the limits of governmental tyranny are what are really at issue here, posting signs in the mock “Free Speech Zones” they’ve created to voice some of their political statements.

After the federal bureau shipped in German shephards, over 200-armed agents, and hired ranch hands to confiscate Bundy’s cattle, milita members from across the U.S. began to arrive to support the rancher. The militia members, as CBS News reports, wearing camouflage and sporting Duck Dynasty-esque beards, have in part been mobilized by Operation Mutual Aid, a national militia with members from California to Missouri. 

Some of the militia members and protestors have posted signs to voice their political gripes, including, “TYRANNY IS ALIVE” and “WHERE’S THE JUSTICE?” One particularly conspicuous sign read, “CONTROL OUR BORDERS! NOT OUR RANCHERS!”

The illegal immigration argument has heated up recently. Last week Democrats in the House attempted to put more pressure on Republican leadership to move on the Senate's immigration bill passed last year. Though the bill contains language intended to strengthen border security, Republicans remain skeptical about the law's implementation and the ramifications of the path to citizenship it would offer to 11 million illegal immigrants. House Democrats, led by Nancy Pelosi and Steve Israel, have recently resorted to declaring publicly that Republican resistance to immigration reform is based in part on racism.

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