Michelle O: ‘We’re Feeling What Not Having Hope Feels Like’

“Help me, Hopey One Kenobi, you’re my only hope.”

Eight years ago, America was introduced to “hope and change” with the election of Barack Hussein Obama. Democrats rejoiced as his campaign slogan “Yes we can” echoed across the fruited plains. Like the babe born in a manger 2,000 years ago, “hope” had once again come to Earth.

But that’s all gone now with the election of Donald Trump, at least according to First Lady Michelle Obama. She spoke to Oprah Winfrey about her feelings on the transition in and out of the White House:

“We feel the difference now. See, now, we’re feeling what not having hope feels like, you know.”

“Hope is necessary,” she continued. “It’s a necessary concept and Barack didn’t just talk about hope because he thought it was just a nice slogan to get votes. I mean, he and I and so many believe that if you — what else do you have if you don’t have hope? What do you give your kids if you can’t give them hope?”

To the Obamas, Trump doesn’t offer the same hope with his slogan “Make America Great Again.” That phrase also echoed across the nation and roared on election night. That gave many Americans hope for the first time in eight years, but the first lady doesn’t seem to think so. It appears that saying “hope” is more effective than, say, keeping jobs in America like the president-elect has done so far with Ford and Carrier. Hope as a concept is more powerful to Democrats than tangible progress. Mrs. Obama praised her husband for the ability to calm their daughters by telling them, “You know what? Babe, it’s okay, it’s okay.” And that’s how she views his legacy:

“I feel that way about the nation. I feel that Barack has been that for the nation in ways that people will come to appreciate. Having a grownup in the White House who can say to you in times of crisis and turmoil: ‘Hey, it’s gonna be OK. Let’s remember the good things that we have. Let’s look at the future. Let’s look at all the things that we’re building.’ All of this is important for our kids to stay focused and to feel like their work isn’t in vain, like their lives aren’t in vain. What do we do if we don’t have hope, Oprah?”

Did anyone else catch how this veiled doom-and-gloom talk doesn't sound very hopeful, coming from the very "grownup" in the White House that just lectured all us little children on giving the nation hope at every opportunity? Consistency is hard for the Left.

Issues

People

Organizations