Gallup: Hillary, Obama Most Admired People in 2017

Just above Donald Trump and Michelle Obama.

When Gallup asked Americans to choose the most admired man and woman in the world, they chose Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton as they have for at least the last 10 years.

Since 2007, and throughout his entire presidency, Obama won the top slot in the Gallup poll. Clinton has been the most admired woman for the last 16 years in a row. However, this is the first year they narrowly claimed the victory. President Trump and former first lady Michelle Obama were hot on their tails:

Obama edges out Donald Trump, 17% to 14%, while Clinton edges out Michelle Obama, 9% to 7%.

Clinton has topped the list a total of 22 times, which is “more than anyone else” including men, according to Gallup. Eleanor Roosevelt has been at the top just 13 times. Obama’s 10 times is bested only by Dwight Eisenhower who has been top choice a total of 12 times. But both politician’s stars faded for the first time this year as Obama’s percentage fell 5% from last year and Clinton’s fell 3%. She polled her lowest in 15 years. In the same poll, Clinton was also awarded a personal low for her favorability rating. (What happened?)

Gallup said Trump joins the ranks of just a handful of incumbent presidents since 1946 who didn’t win the distinction:

Previous incumbent presidents who did not finish first include Harry Truman in 1946-1947 and 1950-1952, Lyndon Johnson in 1967-1968, Richard Nixon in 1973, Gerald Ford in 1974-1975, Jimmy Carter in 1980, and George W. Bush in 2008.

Bill Clinton, the most admired man every year of his presidency, didn’t make the top 10 this year despite being there for the last 25 consecutive polls. (Bill happened.)

Here’s an interesting side note Gallup included:

A quarter of Americans cannot name a man or a woman they admire most. Nine percent name a relative or friend as the most admired man, and 13% do so for the most admired woman.

Given these choices, how could they?

 

 

 

Photo by DonkeyHotey on Foter.com / CC BY

 

 

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