DNC Deputy Chair Denounced Louis Farrakhan 10 Years Ago, Yet Dined With Him Recently

Your Democratic Party, ladies and gentlemen.

Democratic National Committee Deputy Chair Rep. Keith Ellison has some ‘splainin' to do. As recently as 2016, he has restated his decade-old opposition to the “anti-Semitism, homophobia, and chauvinistic model of manhood” put forth by Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan. So, why did he so eagerly attend a private dinner with him and Iranian President Hassan Rouhani just four short years ago?

As the Daily Wire notes, Ellison was pro-Farrakhan back in the ’90s, regularly praising him as a “model for Black youth” and assuring that he is not an anti-Semite. Ellison also worked for Farrakhan during the year-and-a-half leading up to the Million Man March in 1995 of which he also attended. Around this same time, Ellison’s writings included things like, “Zionism must be destroyed.”

But as Ellison climbed the political ladder inside the Democratic Party, he was forced to bury this history. (Sound familiar?) When he ran for the DNC chair in 2016 to replace the disgraced Debbie Wasserman Shultz, Ellison penned an op-ed for The Washington Post in which he claimed his last dealings with Farrakhan were at the 1995 march. But as was first reported by The Wall Street Journal, Ellison, a Muslim, attended a private dinner with Farrakhan that was hosted by Rouhani back in 2013. Also in attendance were other Congressional Black Caucus members, Andre Carson of Indiana and Gregory Meeks of New York. The Iranian president had also gathered Muslim leaders from all over America. Before the WSJ report, this dinner was only mentioned on the Nation of Islam website.

But that's not all. According to Fox News, Farrakhan said he has met with both Ellison and Rep. Carson since that dinner, claiming they visited him in 2015. Ellison’s office did not respond with a comment.

The national media obviously thinks it’s no big deal for a Democrat to dine with a state sponsor of terror and a Hitler admirer:

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