Calls to Boycott ‘Peter Rabbit’ Film Over Scene of ‘Food Allergy Bullying

Anyone remember when kids were feeding each other dynamite sticks after binge watching Looney Tunes? Anyone?

The new animated feature film Peter Rabbit has come under fire from the snowflake culture that finds offense everywhere. Angry parents and petition signers are out to boycott the Sony Pictures Entertainment flick because of its insensitive take on food allergies, of all things.

The hubbub is all over one scene in which a character who is allergic to blackberries is pelted with the fruit until he is sent into anaphylactic shock before administering his own antidote. But get this: the character with the food allergy is the bad guy in the film, Tom McGregor. Peter Rabbit knows of his allergy and comes up with the plan for the berry attack because McGregor wants to kill all the cute, little fluffy bunnies. Wherein most of us call this self-defense, the triggered are calling it bullying.

A charity in Europe, Allergy UK, stated the following:

“Anaphylaxis can and does kill. To include a scene in a children’s film that includes a serious allergic reaction and not to do it responsibly is unacceptable, as is bullying.

“Mocking allergic disease shows a complete lack of understanding of the seriousness of food allergy and trivialises the challenges faced by those who live with this condition, particularly parents who live in fear of their child suffering a life threatening reaction.”

Parents took to Twitter to complain. One post read, “@CommonSense please update your Peter Rabbit listing to warn parents of kids with food allergies about the violent food allergy bullying scene. Pure and unnecessary violence. #BoycottPeterRabbit.”

Other social media messages included the hashtag, #Bullying, when promoting awareness of the scene.

The Food Allergy Research & Education’s Facebook page advised followers to be careful when viewing the film because “this scene may be upsetting to some children.”

Change.org started a petition that asked Sony Pictures for an apology for “mock[ing]  the seriousness of allergic disease,” calling the scene “heartbreakingly disrespectful to the families of those that have lost loved ones to anaphylaxis.”

And so they did:

Food allergies are a serious issue. Our film should not have made light of Peter Rabbit’s archnemesis, Mr. McGregor, being allergic to blackberries, even in a cartoonish, slapstick way. We sincerely regret not being more aware and sensitive to this issue, and we truly apologize.

You caved, therefore you lose, Sony.

Issues