BBC Sending Reporters to School to Teach Kids How to Spot ‘Fake News’

"Lots of children understand that fake news exists but can they really spot it when they see it in the real world?”

Journalists at the left-leaning BBC are being instructed to head to local schools in England and teach schoolchildren how to spot “fake news.” 

According to Breitbart, “High profile and well-paid BBC newsreaders including Kamal Ahmed, Tina Daheley, Amol Rajan, and Huw Edwards will take part.” Their goal next year will be to “mentor” 1,000 kids in the classroom to help them distinguish what they’re seeing across social media.

“Never has it been so important for young people to develop their critical thinking and to be news literate, and have the skills to filter out fakery from the truth, especially on their busy social media feeds,” said James Harding of the BBC. “BBC News, as the most trusted news provider and home of Reality Check, is ideally placed to bring this project to schools and young people around the country.”

The reporters will guide children through news articles looking for trouble spots where “the writer has exaggerated some parts of the story to make you think what they want you to” or where “the facts aren’t clear or haven’t been checked properly,” according to Newsround.

If they don’t reach the kids early enough, they’re worried “young people will stop feeling they can trust ANY news that they read, and will just switch off instead of wanting to learn what's going on in the world.”

President Trump and Brexit will be a hot topic in these discussions. Breitbart discovered a Facebook Live video in which BBC reporter Huw Edwards said, “We saw some of it [fake news] around the Brexit process here. But, I thought, not nearly as much as some of the stuff I saw in the U.S. last year reported on the election there.”

We’re quite sure the impressionable young minds will be directed to more “reliable” outlets such as the BBC. And no need for parents to guide their own children. These folks know what’s best for them.

 

 

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