ABC Miniseries Portrays Average Americans as Bigots, No One Watches

You don't have to have a degree in arts and entertainment to figure out why.

If you watched the Oscars, you saw approximately 137,942 commercials for ABC's new miniseries When We Rise, a gay rights drama made by award-winning gay activist/screenwriter Dustin Lance Black. I felt the ads alone could tell you about everything you needed to know about the series, and apparently the rest of America felt the same way. Heat Street reports that, in spite of the hype, it didn't quite take off like ABC had hoped:

... part one of When We Rise flopped on Monday. As a result, ABC rescheduled Modern Family to run just before the second installment to boost ratings. However, viewership of the second part fell almost 1 million viewers from its premiere, netting an audience of only 2.05 million on Wednesday, which is pathetic for prime-time slot on a commercial TV network.

A conspiracy theory floated around in leftist circles that President Donald Trump purposefully sabotaged the show by scheduling his Congressional address during the broadcast of When We Rise. (This caused the final part of the miniseries to be bumped to a different night.)

However, Heat Street isn't buying that explanation:

... its failure more likely stems from the fact that viewers don’t respond well to ‘virtue scheduling’ on TV. When We Rise at times resembled an infomercial for GLAD (Gay and Lesbian Advocates and Defenders). Even the New York Times didn’t give the show a rave—when the Grey Lady sniffs that a starry gay-rights drama “plays like a high-minded, dutiful educational video,” you know the show is in trouble.

The miniseries, which stars Guy Pearce, Mary Louise Parker and Whoopi Goldberg, failed to connect with the American public because Americans are sick and tired of being lectured by liberals. (You'd think they would've learned that from the Oscar ratings.)

Maybe it's time Hollywood stepped away from the condescension and just focused on telling good stories again.

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