UN Panel Warns Member States Hiding Evidence About Iranian Nuclear Violations

To avoid any possible negative impact on ongoing negotiations

Apparently neither the Obama Administration nor any of the other members of the P+5  teams negotiating the nuclear deal with Iran wants a silly thing like violations of nuclear sanctions to hurt the potential deal. According to the United Nations sanctions panel, member states have stopped reporting Iranian violations "to avoid any possible negative impact on ongoing negotiations between ... Iran and (major powers)." 

Reuters  reported the panel's concern as the U.S. Senate debated the revised Corker-Menendez bill which will require any nuclear agreement with Iran to be reviewed by the Senate:

The panel said it had received no new reports from U.N. member states of confirmed cases of non-compliance involving Iranian nuclear procurement. However, it cautioned that the lack of such reports could be due to multiple reasons.

"The current situation with reporting could reflect a general reduction of procurement activities by the Iranian side or a political decision by some member states to refrain from reporting to avoid any possible negative impact on ongoing negotiations between ... Iran and (major powers)," it said.

Despite the lack of newly confirmed violations the panel said that "some member states informed the panel that according to their assessment, the Islamic Republic of Iran's procurement trends and (sanctions) circumvention techniques remain basically unchanged."

It cited an example of an unnamed member state saying that an Iranian entity had recently attempted to acquire compressors, a key component in the uranium enrichment process, using false end-user certificates in an attempt to evade controls.

The conclusion from the panel is that there's been "a political decision by some member states to refrain from reporting to avoid any possible negative impact on ongoing negotiations." That's polite diplo-speak for accusing governments of withholding intelligence on Iranian cheating, because that would make it awkward to sell an Iran deal to their public and to legislators.

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