A Strange Moment Indeed: CNN Asks NPR if Fox News is Really News

Like an ostrich asking an emu if a bird can fly...

On CNN’s ironically-named Reliable Sources Sunday, host Brian Stelter served a particularly poetic question to a correspondent from an equally-leftist propaganda organization — as Stelter faced David Folkenflik of NPR, he queried:

“You and I have covered Fox News for years. Is it appropriate to call the channel a news channel?”

And there they sat — two members of institutions which claim to be news but are mouthpieces for the Democratic Party, condescendingly questioning another news network’s validity.

Hmmm…

Folkenflik seized the moment:

“Fox News is not about news. Fox News is about Fox. Fox News is about getting a tonal point of view, making sure that viewers get what they think viewers need to get, whether or not that involves, much of the time, facts.”

Wow. But then again, that’s coming from NPR, which — as noted by Fox News (turnabout is fair play) — has an interesting relationship to the facts itself.

CNN isn’t exactly in the political middle; as per Newsbusters, it’s run stories scrutinizing President Trump’s Diet Coke consumption, as well as labeling him a bully for taking an extra scoop of ice cream.

To Stelter's credit, he did note that there are credible journalists at Fox, as opposed to hosts of opinion-oriented shows. Folkenflik was less convinced, as demonstrated by the transcript below:

STELTER: So, David Folkenflik, do we call this collusion?

FOLKENFLIK: I think you've seen an almost total erosion between what you're hearing from Trump administration officials desperately spinning and trying to defend the president, Trump surrogates who appear on cable networks all the time and the Fox News talent, the hosts, the commentators, the people being paid by Rupert Murdoch and by 21st Century Fox and Fox News. They're offering the same message.

And the message is, don't look at or think about what may be under investigation. Let's find whatever we can to undermine the pillars of the respect that we tend to confer upon institutions like the FBI and the Justice Department.

STELTER: You and I have covered Fox News for years. Is it appropriate to call the channel a news channel?

FOLKENFLIK: It's such a good question. I think that —

STELTER: Shepherd Smith is a journalist. He works for Fox.

FOLKENFLIK: Here's what I would say —

STELTER: Bret Baier is a journalist. He works for Fox.

FOLKENFLIK: Here's what I would say, here's what I would say, and I think it's only more true now in the Trump era. I would say that there are journalists, there are reporters, there are producers, there are people who care about the news who work at Fox News. Fox News is not about news. Fox News is about Fox. Fox News is about getting a tonal point of view, making sure that viewers get what they think viewers need to get, whether or not that involves, much of the time, facts. And you see it -- you know it's true because it's true at the most highly rated times of day. It's true for who is being paid, who is being promoted, why are they being promoted. You see anchors who are slipping into some of those "Fox & Friends" host guest slots and they start taking a sharper tone. They start taking a more kind of incredulous look on their faces. They are pushing out the same message of incredulity about prosecutors, investigators, doing their job, trying to look at some very serious issues being raised about people who are around this president.

 

 

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