Professors: 5 New Types of 'Invisibility Micro Aggressions’

Here we go again...

It’s not just the microagressions women of color can see and hear that are a problem — there are invisible ones that plague them, too. In fact, there are apparently five whole categories of them. 
Luckily, two “professors” — one at Bucknell and the other at University of Rhode Island — are on the case.

The academics interviewed 13 women of color who work at “predominantly white institutions.” What they found will astound you (or no, not really). Campus Reform expands

Jasmine Mena, a Psychology professor at Bucknell University, and Annemarie Vaccaro, who teaches Higher Education at the University of Rhode Island, claim they are the first academics to argue that “invisibility” is a “common form of microaggression” experienced by professors of color.

According to their study, which was published in the NASPA Journal About Women In Higher Education, the three environmental microaggressions that women of color face relate to their “invisibility” on campus, in disciplinary/professional settings, and in their local communities, because they are “among the few, or only” people of color in each context. [...]

Of the five, the most common was “campus invisibility,” which many faculty of color experienced as one of the few racial minorities on campus.

“I feel invisible…not always…but as sort of a day-to-day thing,” said Xiomara, one the 18 participants in the study, adding, “I just feel like I can go days without seeing another person of color.”

Linda, another woman of color, told researchers that “any meeting I walk into that usually I’m the only person of color,” noting that that she feels like “people don’t even know we exist most of the time.”

Unlike more traditional forms of microaggressions, such as microassaults and macroaggressions, no second-party is needed for an “invisibility microaggression” to occur. Instead, merely a lack of other racial minorities in a specific environment (such as a faculty meeting or in a cafeteria) can be a microaggression under this theory, according to Mena and Vaccaro.

Meanwhile, the second most common “invisibility microaggression” is “professional invisibility,” which refers to a lack of people of color in a faculty member’s respective academic field, and, as is the case with “campus invisibility,” no actual insult needs to occur for a “professional invisibility” microaggression to occur.

We think progressives have way too much time on their hands. 

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