Mom Selling Letter from Obama to Help Cover Expenses for Injured Veteran Son

"It is doing no good lying in my drawer. It means absolutely nothing to me."

A mother of an injured military veteran is having to sell a handwritten letter from President Obama to help cover her son's expenses that have accumulated because of the failures of the Veterans Administration. All of this despite the promise in the letter that states, "Michelle and I intend to do everything we can over the next four years to support your family."

Cherry McKimmey received the rare, personalized letter from the president in July 2009 on the heals of her personal campaign for her son, David, who was seeking treatment at VA hospitals for his injuries while living on disability benefits. David's injuries include second- and third-degree burns to his face which he received after attempting to crawl back into a burning vehicle in Iraq to save two soldiers who would later die. He will also likely lose his leg as a result, reports The Washington Examiner. The soldier received the Bronze Star with Valor for his brave actions. However, the VA labeled his injuries "minor," which means he isn't able to receive certain types of special care.

Upon hearing of the ordeal the McKimmey family was going through, which included the expenses of long drives to VA centers, President Obama wrote a letter to the mother:

Cherry - Thank your for your note. We are grateful for your son's service, and Michelle and I intend to do everything we can over the next four years to support your family and other military families. God Bless, Barack Obama

But nearly four years after that promise, McKimmey says nothing has changed, and so has decided to sell the letter after learning a rare letter like this could fetch thousands of dollars at auction.

"Something good might as well come out of that," McKimmey said. "It is doing no good lying in my drawer. It means absolutely nothing to me." 

Speaking with the Examiner by phone, McKimmey added that she believes the letter was just an attempt at appeasement by the president.

"We just assumed everything would be taken care of," she said. "We should have known better."

The letter went up for sale Wednesday online at Alexander Historical Auctions, which describes more detail about the letter and the VA scandals that have continued to plague the president. It is estimated to bring $3,000-4,000. The auction house is dropping its commission fee and donating a portion of the buyer's premium to the McKimmey family. 

View the auction here.

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