Florida Students Suggest ‘Badge of Shame’ for Politicians Supported by NRA

Children, the new frontier in the Left’s push for gun control.

Students rallied in Florida over the weekend, shouting angry gun control demands at Congress and President Trump after many of them witnessed classmates and teachers getting shot at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland last week. 

The Left has seized this opportunity and are using theses traumatized students to push its gun control agenda. The media is giving the children an open platform to criticize the Trump administration and leftist groups, like the Women’s March, are organizing nationwide school walkouts to protest guns. The emotional pleas are very impactful and the Left knows it. What kind of horrible people does it take to ignore the tears of children and let them die in school?

Republicans, obvs.

That’s why an idea was floated during the protests that a “badge of shame” should be applied to any politician accepting money from the National Rifle Association. Student Cameron Kasky spoke out a rally in Fort Lauderdale on Saturday and appeared on CNN’s State of the Union on Sunday where he said:

“We are losing our lives while the adults are playing around. This is about us begging for our lives. This isn’t about the GOP. This isn’t about the Democrats. This is about us creating a badge of shame for any politicians accepting money from the NRA and using us as collateral.”

In the video above is another student, Emma Gonzalez. Her emotional speech at the Fort Lauderdale rally has been on repeat all over the mainstream media. She, too, is angry at Trump and says it’s going to take a lot more than “thoughts and prayers” to prevent future tragedies:

“All these people should be at home grieving. But instead we are up here, standing together, because if all our government and president can do is send ‘thoughts and prayers,’ then it’s time for victims to be the change that we need to see.

"If the president wants to come up to me and tell me to my face that it was a 'terrible tragedy,' I'm going to happily ask him how much money he received from the NRA."

Gonzalez repeatedly called “BS” on the NRA and all of its supporters from the podium.

Many in the crowd held signs urging voters to vote out Florida Republican Marco Rubio. One sign read, “We don’t want your thoughts and condolences, we want policy and change.”

At least one Republican has softened his stance in the wake of this shooting. On his website, Ohio Gov. John Kasich changed a section on gun rights, according to MSN.com:

The February 17 version of the campaign page, entitled "Defending the Second Amendment," includes images of Kasich at what appears to be an ammunition store and touts an endorsement by the National Rifle Association in his 2014 re-election campaign. The campaign suggests "removing burdensome restrictions for law-abiding concealed carry licenses" and highlights "opposing Barack Obama's gun control efforts."

But a current version of the page, renamed "Common sense on the Second Amendment," does not include images with gun owners or advocates. The page states that Kasich "recognizes the need for common-sense solutions to our nation's problems."

"In recent years, our country has been devastated by a dramatic increase in school shootings and mass killings -- many with the use of semi-automatic weapons," the issue page says. "Governor Kasich believes that we should not be afraid to learn from these tragedies and take appropriate action."

Kasich agreed with students, saying they “are absolutely right when they say that politicians have not been responding to any of this.” In an appearance on CNN, Kasich blasted, “Would you feel as though your Second Amendment rights would be eroded because you couldn’t buy a goddarn AR-15? These are things that have to be looked at, and action has to be taken.”

It appears as though the tears of children are pulling on plenty of heartstrings, but there’s an important lesson in all of these if those people would take a step back from the emotion and look at the facts:

 

 

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