Firearms in Film: For Hypocritical Hollywood, Business is Booming

You take a picture; you shoot a movie.

In the wake of the Las Vegas massacre, given the dialogue and diatribes up and down the entertainment dial, one thing is certain: Hollywood hates guns, and it denounces them every chance it gets — except in the movies. In light of the content of Tinseltown’s biggest-budget pushes toward box office gold, one thing is obvious: Hollywood loves guns, and it features them every chance it gets.  

In fact, at the same time that mass murderer Stephen Paddock was violently attacking a concert crowd of 22,000 with what effectively were automatic rifles, three of Hollywood’s five biggest September hits featured similar gunfire ripping through JBL speakers at a cineplex near you. Furthermore, two of the movies — Kingsman: Golden Circle and American Assassin — contained so many instances of rapid-fire violence that it was nearly impossible to count.

The top five movies the week before the mass shooting were rife with silver-screen carnage, by way of gun violence as well as other forms. Leaving out the violence in The Lego Ninjago Movie, just four movies that week — Kingsman: Golden Circle, American Assassin, It, and Mother! — contained 589 instances of violence, with 212 of those being violence wrought by a firearm. The body count for the four films was 192, and automatic weapons were used at least 108 times. The number of shots fired by such weapons was beyond countable.

Furthermore, the mere trailer of Kingsman offered incredible firepower packed in under two minutes. For a reminder of what Hollywood is doing when it isn’t decrying guns, take a look at the clip featuring gun control activist — and hypocrite — Julianne Moore:

For all of Hollywood’s leftist noise of self-righteous scorn against the Second Amendment and American citizens who wish to protect their families and property, the loudmouths in La-La Land sure are quick to make a big boom to the tune of unlimited caliber when it lights up moviegoers and lines their pious pocketbooks.

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