Washington Post: The Tea Party Has its Roots in Dallas 1963

"It was fueled then, as now, by billionaires opposed to federal oversight, rabid media, Bible-thumping preachers and extremist lawmakers who had moved far from their political peers."

The Washington Post dishonored the memory of JFK by spewing vile hatred toward a group of Americans in an article called, "Tea party has roots in the Dallas of 1963." The article by Bill Minutaglio abandoned fact and history to trash a grass roots movement of people who might very well have been among Kennedy's biggest supporters.

To find the very roots of the tea party of 2013, just go back to downtown Dallas in 1963, back to the months and weeks leading to the Kennedy assassination. It was where and when a deeply angry political polarization, driven by a band of zealots, burst wide open in America.

It was fueled then, as now, by billionaires opposed to federal oversight, rabid media, Bible-thumping preachers and extremist lawmakers who had moved far from their political peers. In 1963, that strident minority hijacked the civic dialogue and brewed the boiling, toxic environment waiting for Kennedy the day he died.

As he planned his trip to Dallas in November 1963, President Kennedy knew that hundreds of thousands across Texas adored him — or at least, respected the office he held. But he also knew that there was an increasingly hysterical fringe.

As Kennedy approached Dallas, he turned to his wife, Jacqueline. “We’re heading into nut country today,” he said.

It is obvious that Minutaglio believes in the false conspiracy meme that people like the "evil" Koch brothers astroturf the Tea Party.

Minutaglio suggests that the venom coming from the press directed at the president in 1963 is just like today, but neglects to mention that today it comes not from the right, but from MSNBC and the like, and is directed toward conservatives and the Tea Party. He speaks to the fact that segregationists hated Kennedy but fails to mention that those segregationists resided mostly in JFK's own Democratic Party. To push another of the false charges progressives make against the Tea Party, Minutaglio explains the bigotry in Dallas in 1963:

In the days leading to Kennedy’s fateful hour in Dallas, the city experienced one dark moment after another. Swastikas were plastered on the high-end emporium Neiman Marcus. A bomb threat was made during a visit by the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. A cross was burned on the lawn of a Holocaust survivor. U.N. Ambassador Adlai E. Stevenson II, in town for a speech, fled for his life after being surrounded by a spitting mob.

Perhaps the most glaring fact that Minutaglio misses is that one of the biggest objectives of the Tea Party movement as a whole is cutting taxes which, as the video above shows, was one of Kennedy's big domestic pushes as well. If there were a Tea Party movement back then, it likely would have gravitated toward an alliance with JFK. But Minutaglio is not interested in printing the truth, only pushing his political narrative.

 

 

 

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