Judicial Watch Strongly Urges Trump to Make Good on Promise to Investigate Clinton

Vows to continue its own vigorous pursuit of the truth.

Conservative government watchdog group Judicial Watch has strongly urged President-elect Donald Trump to make good on his campaign promise to investigate the e-mail scandal of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. 

Like many Trump supporters, Judicial Watch President Tom Fitton was chafed by the apparent softening of Trump’s stern threat in the second presidential debate to appoint a special prosecutor to ensure Clinton spent some time in prison for breaching national security. As of a week ago, Trump reportedly said, “It’s just not something that I feel very strongly about.”

“I don’t want to hurt the Clintons, I really don’t,” he added. “She went through a lot and suffered greatly in many different ways."

In a later interview on CBS’s 60 Minutes, Trump reiterated the sentiment: “I don’t want to hurt them. They’re good people.”

Top aides in the new administration said the damage to Clinton’s character and the distrust from the American public is punishment enough.

But even though Trump indicated his supporters wouldn’t be disappointed, Fitton isn’t one of them:

Donald Trump must commit his administration to a serious, independent investigation of the very serious Clinton national security, email, and pay-to-play scandals.  If Mr. Trump’s appointees continue the Obama administration’s politicized spiking of a criminal investigation of Hillary Clinton, it would be a betrayal of his promise to the American people to “drain the swamp” of out-of-control corruption in Washington, DC. President-elect Trump should focus on healing the broken justice system, affirm the rule of law and appoint a special prosecutor to investigate the Clinton scandals. 

Fitton added that his own organization isn’t going to let up at all: “In the meantime, Judicial Watch will vigorously pursue its independent litigation and investigation of the Clinton email, national security, and other corruption scandals.”

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