FBI Refuses to Release Files on Clinton Investigation, Citing Public Disinterest

Um, we’re interested.

The FBI won’t release documents pertaining to the e-mail investigation of Hillary Clinton, stating there’s not enough public interest surrounding the case.

The bureau rejected an open-records request by lawyer Ty Clevenger who sought to have the former secretary of state punished for perjury, The Washington Times reports. He was sent a letter from the FBI on Monday which stated, “You have not sufficiently demonstrated that the public’s interest in disclosure outweighs personal privacy interests of the subject. It is incumbent upon the requester to provide documentation regarding the public’s interest in the operations and activities of the government before records can be processed pursuant to the FOIA [Freedom of Information Act].”

The Times added:

The FBI says it will only release records from its files if a subject consents, is dead, or is of such public interest that it overrides privacy concerns.

Mr. Clevenger said he thought it would have been clear why Mrs. Clinton’s case was of public interest, but he sent documentation anyway, pointing to a request by members of Congress for an investigation into whether Mrs. Clinton perjured herself in testimony to Capitol Hill.

Clevenger told The Times that he is “stunned” by the rejection.

“This is exactly what I would have expected had Mrs. Clinton won the election, but she didn’t,” Clevenger said. “It looks like the Obama Administration is still running the FBI.”

Clevenger can’t understand the FBI’s logic when the public remained invested in the investigation for the entire election season and the year prior. To him, there's still plenty of public interest in this scandal.

“If this is the new standard, then there’s no such thing as a public interest exception,” said Clevenger.

A petition at the White House has been started to let the FBI know that, in face, a lot of us remain quite interested in seeing Clinton pay for the crimes she committed.

 

Photo credit: DonkeyHotey via Foter.com / CC BY

 

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