College #BlackLivesMatter Protests Turning Aggressive: 'F*** You, Filthy Whites'

Making "filthy white b****" cry, pushing, shoving, and storming the library.

Protesters shouting "black lives matter" and racial obscenities stormed Dartmouth University's library on Thursday as college protests begin turning more and more aggressive.

In all, according to a Dartmouth Review report, about 150 protesters dressed in black descended on unsuspecting students, marching and shouting, “F*** you, you filthy white f***s!," "F*** you and your comfort!," "F*** you, you racist s***!” It is indicated that they turned on others who weren't joining their shenanigans:

Throngs of protesters converged around fellow students who had not joined in their long march. They confronted students who bore “symbols of oppression”: “gangster hats” and Beats-brand headphones.  The flood of demonstrators self-consciously overstepped every boundary, opening the doors of study spaces with students reviewing for exams. Those who tried to close their doors were harassed further. One student abandoned the study room and ran out of the library. The protesters followed her out of the library, shouting obscenities the whole way.

Students who refused to listen to or join their outbursts were shouted down.  “Stand the f*** up!”  “You filthy racist white piece of s***!”  Men and women alike were pushed and shoved by the group.  “If we can’t have it, shut it down!” they cried.  Another woman was pinned to a wall by protesters who unleashed their insults, shouting “filthy white b****!” in her face.

Campus Reform obtained some footage from inside, as seen above.

One student who was initially a proud participant of the protest later admitted to leaving after things turned "ugly:"

Hundreds of Dartmouth students and community members participated in the blackout protest last night. I was proud to be one of them.

It was inspiring to walk through campus all in black, and to see so many other students doing the same.

But I didn’t make it to the end of the protest, by which time a small group of participants had descended to aggressive verbal harassment of their fellow students.

An anonymous student who was studying in Novack describes the incident that followed:

I was sitting in Novack studying when a large group of protestors came in chanting ‘black lives matter.’ They gathered in the center of Novack amongst the tables where there were a number of people working peacefully.

They kept shouting and started banging on tables. They demanded that people stand up to show their solidarity. Those who did not stand were targeted and questioned.

This regretful protester mentions the mob targeting a guy and yelling, "If we can't study, you can't study." He wouldn't bow to their questioning and identified himself as Latino, to which they further shouted him down with insults and applause.

He goes on to describe bowing out of the protest. Here's why:

After making a girl cry, a protestor screamed “F*** your white tears.”

I was startled by the aggression from a small minority of students towards students in the library, many of whom were supporters of the movement.

From what I witnessed, a small number of the protestors resorted to aggressive verbal harassment. I didn’t see any physical aggression.

At that moment, the protest strategies became counterproductive. I chose to leave the event before it was over.

I am a proud supporter of the Black Lives Matter movement, but I was ashamed at what the protest turned into.

Verbally harassing students, and disrupting people in the library is not an effective protest strategy and does not create constructive dialogue. The protest ended up polarizing the campus further.

The Dartmouth Review makes this conclusion of the appalling display, as noted over at Breitbart:

[E]mpathy has its limits. The desire to side with self-described victims is rooted in a spirit of charity. But the habit of doing so even when every ounce of evidence suggests that we ought not to amounts to a total forfeiture of our own ability to discern.

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