Women Accuse Sports Blogger of Sex Harassment, Turns Out ‘He’ Was Teen Girl

This is how #MeToo will get out of hand.

Major players across film, television, and journalism are being cast away after an influx of sexual abuse allegations and admissions are rocking the powerful. Women and men on the receiving end of these unwanted sexual advances have finally been emboldened by the sheer number of accusers willing to step forward. However, the #MeToo movement isn't without it's hiccups, as evidenced by this story about sports writer Ryan Schultz.

For the last eight years, Schultz has been writing about baseball for various sports sites. He has been known to be married with two children. But recently, he, too, has been rocked with allegations of sexual harassment by several women who claim they were harassed online. But there’s just one problem: Schultz is really a girl writing under a pseudonym.

The San Francisco Gate explains:

[Schultz is] a young Missouri woman who had written under the false identity since she was 13. 

A Deadspin report revealed the identity of Ryan Schultz to be 21-year-old Becca Schultz, who took on the identity to freely write for sites like SB Nation and Baseball Prospectus. As the years went by, Becca couldn't figure out how to disentangle herself from the fabricated persona. 

This weekend, Schultz tweeted “a misogynistic joke that ruffled some online feathers,” Deadspin added. Her Twitter account has since been deleted. That's when everything started to unravel.

Apparently, at least two of these “victims” sent Schultz nude photos of themselves and regularly chatted with “him” online about baseball and hockey. They said Schultz would often be “drunk” and “berate them” and then “imply that he’d hurt himself” if they stopped communicating.

Schultz believed this "stereotypical guy" persona was the only way to be female and write in a male-dominated field.

"I was young and had no idea what to do," Schultz said. “So I just acted like I thought a man would."

It’s a complicated world out there.

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