Voter ID Glitch in High Democratic County in Battleground State has NAACP in a Panic

Election officials say it will not affect votes.

Voting glitches early on Tuesday in Durham County, North Carolina, a battleground state, were met with a lawsuit to extend the voting hours 90 minutes to ensure everyone casts a ballot.

A glitch in the electronic check-in system meant a switchover to paper roll taking. This didn’t affect voting but caused a delay, with some leaving the lines after waiting too long. Per state law in NC, all voting locations must be affected for an extension to be warranted but because this particular polling place is in a highly Democratic area, some are crying foul.

The NAACP chapter president Rev. Dr. William Barber put out the following statement:

"Number one: We demand that they fix this glitch. There were no glitches in early voting. Why now and why in a heavy black voting area?"

Barber added, “We have our lawyers going to locations. They also must encourage people not to leave because the problem is with system, not the people.”

However, Gov. Pat McCrory said everything is under control and every vote will count:

"I want the votes counted as quick as they can in all counties in North Carolina. I just talked to the elections board supervisor and said that I want every vote to count, and every vote will count."

The NAACP said 45 people were turned away in one hour, but county election officials said those were voluntary because of the wait, not voters turned away.

There are many skeptical reactions to this breaking news on Twitter:

 

 

 

 

 

The Freedom Center is a 501c3 non-profit organization. Therefore we do not endorse political candidates either in primary or general elections. However, as defenders of America’s social contract, we insist that the rules laid down by both parties at the outset of campaigns be respected, and that the results be decided by free elections. We will oppose any attempt to rig the system and deny voters of either party their constitutional right to elect candidates of their choice.

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