Socialist Venezuela Plagued by Daily Riots, Looting

"Behind all this is the president, the rat in his palace, eating riches while we fight to buy pasta."

The citizens of the socialist utopia Venezuela are starving and rioting, according to a news story by Reuters:

Food riots and violent looting have become a daily occurrence across scarcity-struck Venezuela and a major problem for the struggling leftist government of President Nicolas Maduro.

Venezuelans are skipping meals, foraging for food and picking fruit off trees in order to feed themselves:

Despite hours in lines, Venezuelans increasingly find that coveted supplies of subsidized flour and rice run out before they can buy them. Many are skipping meals, getting by on mangoes stripped from trees - or taking matters into their own hands.

"We're not eating. People are desperate for a looting," said mother-of-three Miza Colmenares, 55, who had spent the night in line and not eaten since the previous day when she had eggs for breakfast.

More than 10 lootings occur every day now, according to the Venezuelan Observatory of Violence, and are increasing in the usually more insulated capital.

More than a quarter of the 641 protests last month were for food, according to a tally by the Venezuelan Observatory of Social Conflict, a figure that has risen every month this year.

The citizens are turning on President Maduro. "Behind all this is the president, the rat in his palace, eating riches while we fight to buy pasta," said homemaker Maria Perez, 31, once a Chavez supporter, at the El Valle supermarket.

Maduro claims the opposition is hoarding food to foment an uprising. "We're going to tire of this. There will be something like the 'Caracazo' for sure," said Yubisai Blanco, 40, clutching her two bags of pasta after seven hours in line. "Caracazo" refers to the weeklong wave of protests, riots, looting, shootings and massacres in February 1989 in the capital Caracas which resulted in the deaths of hundreds, perhaps thousands of people, mostly at the hands of security forces and the military.

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