Santorum: 'Repubs Care Less About Person at Bottom of Ladder than Dems Do'

"The Republican Party is heading toward No-ville."

In an Associated Press interview, former presidential candidate Rick Santorum offered his advice to fellow Republicans on how to win elections: stop looking to Ronald Reagan, quit demonizing social welfare programs, and move away from "no-government conservatism."

Santorum, who struggled throughout his campaign for president, tells the AP that although he hasn't ruled out a 2016 candidacy, he is not sure he can stomach another. But he did have plenty of advice for other Republicans and how they should move forward in winning elections.

One quote from his upcoming book "Blue Collar Conservatives: Recommitting to an America That Works" indicates Republicans care less about the "little guy" than Democrats:

Do Republicans really care less about the person at the bottom of the ladder than Democrats do? To be painfully honest, I would have to say in some ways 'yes.'

Santorum also says that with the likes of Sen. Ted Cruz and Rep. Rand Paul, the "libertarian streak" that is running through the party "distorts the definition of freedom." He adds:

There's a strain within the Republican Party now that smacks of the no-government conservatism. That wasn't Ronald Reagan. It wasn't Teddy Roosevelt. It wasn't Abraham Lincoln. It wasn't any Republican that I'm aware of. It wasn't Calvin Coolidge. And yet there seems to be this creation of this strain of conservatism that has no basis in conservatism.

But Santorum criticized those who may look to Reagan's policies as a blue print for today's political climate saying, "[P]oliticians wrongly look to President Ronald Reagan's policies to address today's challenges." He proposes that Reagan would probably not issue the same policies he had in the '70s and '80s.

Continuing his chiding of the GOP, the former Pennsylvania senator says in the interview that Republicans are not "painting a positive vision for America," instead, they are "heading toward No-ville, which is 'we're against this, we're against that, we're against this.'"

Santorum admits to the AP that these statements, and others in his book, will probably "haunt him" if he does decide to run in 2016.

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