Salon Condemns Milo, but Only After Deleting Their Own Pedophile-Normalizing Articles

Has Salon ever heard of a screen shot?

In May 2016, Todd Nickerson wrote an article in Salon describing pedophilia as a sexual orientation, much like homosexuality or heterosexuality. TruthRevolt reported:

It all began in September last year with the article “I’m a pedophile, but not a monster,” which featured self-identified pedophile Todd Nickerson of the website “Virtuous Pedophiles” classify his sexual disorder as a “sexual identity” that needs to be met with some kind of compassion. Though neither Nickerson nor Salon advocates that pedophiles should be allowed to act on their urges, they do feel they should be allowed to be open about their identities without facing repercussions or be ostracized, as if people would be wrong to shield their children from ever being in their presence.

In a new video released Tuesday, Salon featured Nickerson talking openly about the nature of his sexual disorder, which he classifies as an orientation, and how he manages to resist the urge to molest children.

According to Nickerson, at age 18, he babysat a five-year old girl and fell in love with her, and since he never wanted to act on his urges, he chose to privately “relieve” himself instead. Thankfully, he has never molested a child his whole life and doesn’t wish to. Instead, Nickerson wants to foster a new attitude in society that allows pedophiles to openly identify as such so they won’t be forced underground.

But now that the magazine has excoriated libertarian provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos, they deleted these posts.

Of course, people noticed.  Most assumed the online magazine simply couldn't condemn Milo's apparent pro-pedophilia comments while allowing Nickerson's pedophilia-as-another-orientation articles to remain on the same website. 

Again and again, the media exercises selective outrage against people who disagree with their leftwing politics...  in their opinion, that's the biggest taboo of all.

Photo credit: Instagram

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