Painting of Decapitated Trump Allowed to Hang in Art Gallery at U of Alaska

Oh, right, "art."

A painting depicting the severed head of President Trump hangs in a University of Alaska-Anchorage art gallery with not much fuss at all. 

Created by an assistant professor, Thomas Chung, the painting features a naked actor Chris Evans — yeah, the Captain America — holding the head of the president as blood drips down onto a young Hillary Clinton dressed in white, clinging to the leg of Evans.

Chung said his reason for the brutal painting was a result of him spending “days just weeping” after election night and that his feelings on Trump’s victory just “bled into that.” Apparently literally.

Though he was hesitant to submit the work for a faculty art show knowing the controversy it would stir, Chung figured at the very least, it would start a conversation:

“I was really torn about putting this piece up a faculty show, because I would never talk about my own political beliefs to my students. I would never push that upon them and make them feel uncomfortable, and so I wondered to myself if putting up this painting was in a way doing that. But I realized that I feel very strongly about this, and I think even students that might be pro-Trump supporters could benefit from having a conversation with me about why I feel this way — why I painted this.”

Does anybody believe a Trump-hating professor would hide those political feelings from students? Didn’t think so.

A former UAA professor, Paul R. Berger, spoke out from his conservative perspective: “First thing that comes to mind is freedom of expression, fair enough (although, I might wager the severed head of our former president might illicit a different response from the administration of UAA and their student body). The second is public funding of our university system.”

Berger also made the astute observation that a severed Obama head would illicit a completely different reaction:

“Had the roles been reversed, and it was Obama’s head hanging there, I think the outrage would be fantastic. As a free speech advocate, everyone has a right to express their opinion the way they want to express them. But as a parent and a citizen, there’s a discussion. In a university setting, what’s appropriate?”

Chung’s “art” had the full backing of the university’s fine arts department:

“I guess the people are upset about the work that’s being shown. If they were taking a class at the university and made art that was considered controversial, no matter what their political or religious bent is, we would do our best to protect them and protect their rights to make that kind of work in the institution, whether it would be a student or faculty.”

That would not be the statement if that was Obama’s head bleeding out. 

Watch the local coverage below:

H/T The Blaze

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