Oxford Students Want Statue of 'Colonialist' Cecil Rhodes Removed

“Our history is not a blank page on which we can write our own version of what it should have been, according to our contemporary views and prejudices.”

In its ongoing attempts to erase all non-Islamic history and culture from the earth, ISIS is now demanding the removal of an on-campus statue of British colonialist Cecil Rhodes from the Oxford University campus.

Oops, my mistake. This time it's not ISIS destroying statues that offend their ideological sensibilities, but Oxford students themselves, the Daily Caller reports. Because today, college students are barely distinguishable from Islamic fundamentalists in their zeal to erase elements of the past that don't conform to their destructive ideology. 

Rhodes was a student at Oxford in the late 19th century. He went on to become a mining magnate, South African politician, the founder of what used to be known as Rhodesia, and the founder as well of the De Beers diamond company. He bestowed Oxford tons of money to fund campus construction and also to create the well-known Rhodes Scholarship.

The protesters against his imperialist ideals include Rhodes scholars, who deflect charges of hypocrisy by declaring that the scholarship “does not buy our silence.” Some students - mostly women or of African origin - claim to have accepted the scholarship as a way to indirectly punish Rhodes for his actions, “knowing that Cecil Rhodes did not intend it [the scholarship] for us.”

University chancellor Chris Patten addressed the protesters' demands sensibly:

“Our history is not a blank page on which we can write our own version of what it should have been, according to our contemporary views and prejudices... Our cities are full of buildings that were built with the proceeds of activities, the slave trade and so on, which would nowadays be regarded as completely unacceptable.”

Patten went on to note that Rhodes’ attitudes were “common to his time” and so he doesn't deserve such condemnation more than a century later.

Protesters at the University of Cape Town were successful in removing Rhodes' statue back in April. As the Daily Caller notes, similar protests have also taken place at U.S. universities in recent months.

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