Operation Martha's Vineyard: Bomb Iraq, Then Hit the Links!

"Very significant" that there is no name to Iraq air strikes

On Friday's The Kelly File on Fox News, retired Lt. Gen. Tom McInerney told guest host Shannon Bream that the Obama administration's choice to not name the mission of the recent air strikes in Iraq could indicate that the president thinks the mission is insignificant, especially in light of Obama leaving for vacation to Martha's Vineyard immediately following the announcement.

Obama ordered the strikes against ISIS which included a pair of F18 fighters dropping 500 pound bombs in Irbil, Iraq. The reason for the strikes was two-fold: the area contained U.S. personnel and a consulate, plus the tens of thousands of stranded Christians and other minority groups that had retreated to the mountains, fleeing the spreading ISIS.

Bream indicated that Pentagon officials said they deliberately left the operation nameless and asked McInerney how significant that decision was:

It's very significant, Shannon, and I think the White House better get their hands on it or it's going to be called Operation Martha's Vineyard. The president does not want that. We in the military operate under different operations: Operation Iraqi Freedom, Operation Enduring Freedom. All those type terms have to do with our campaign and our history. And so it's very important that the -- it shows the significance of the operation when you put a name on it. And unfortunately, he's making it sound like it isn't significant.

By the end of the program, McInerney's expert naming of the offensive had birthed a new trend on Twitter: #OperationMarthasVineyard.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

At 2:27 p.m., the pool report came in from the Vineyard. 

 After spending about 30 minutes at the house, President Obama departed for the first golf outing of the vacation.  The motorcade made its way to Farm Neck Golf Club in Oak Bluffs. The club sits on a peninsula overlooking Nantucket Sound.  There's no word yet on the president's golf partners today. 

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