MSNBC Host Calls Cruz Health Amendment ‘Garbage,’ Backs Off When Expert Proves Him Wrong

The media just can’t hide its bias. Ever.

Republican Sen. Ted Cruz’s health care amendment is “garbage,” according to MSNBC host Ali Velshi. But after his guest and health care expert Lanhee Chen explained to him why it wasn’t garbage, Velshi backed off and was forced to admit he doesn’t know what he’s talking about.

Cruz issued an amendment to the Senate version of the health care bill that would allow insurance companies “to sell non-Obamacare-compliant, bare bones health insurance plans if they also provided an Obamacare-complaint option with all the attending minimum requirements,” as The Washington Free Beacon explains.

Velshi called it a “very strange Ted Cruz plan which basically offers you a low premium in exchange for a box of band-aids and hope nothing bad happens to you.”

"As an expert on this you would agree that at some point it's just garbage, right?" Velshi asked Lonnie Chen, MSNBC’s health care expert. "The stuff that Ted Cruz is peddling is very low premiums for virtually nonexistent health care?"

Chen diagreed and argued that having options with healthcare, unlike Obamacare, is in no way garbage and said Republicans are trying to offer more choices:

"What this is about is, what kind of plan do people want? That's the point that I think Ted Cruz is trying to get at there. I wouldn't call it complete garbage.

"The notion that people ought to have some optionality over the plan that suits them best, I don't think is a garbage idea at all. In fact, if you have someone who is relatively healthy, who's doing relatively well financially, they may make a different set of decisions than someone who is not doing as well or who is sicker.

"In the current system under the Affordable Care Act, that amount of optionality does not exist. That's what Republicans are trying to get towards.”

"I'm gonna take Lonnie's word on that that garbage might be a little strong," Velshi, the non-health care expert, reluctantly concluded.

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