Michael Moore Hospitalized, Calls for 'Grassroots Army' to Help Sell New Movie

"You are going to be seriously f***ed up by this film."

Michael Moore's press junket to promote his new documentary, Where To Invade Next, has been put on indefinite hold as the filmmaker was just released from the intensive care unit where he spent a week suffering from pneumonia. 

He made a plea to his fans online, telling them, "Sidelined by a visit to the ICU, I could use your help." He explains his ordeal in a little more detail:

Thank you to all who have written to me about my stay this past week in the intensive care unit. Unfortunately, as you may have heard, I came down with pneumonia. Truth be told, it was pretty serious, and other complications arose. But then, five days later, I was still alive — thanks to a combination of Directors Guild insurance, two I-V drips of alleged legal drugs, and a hospital TV that only got FOX News. I was released on my own recognizance, which I tried to explain may not be the best idea. I am now at home resting…

But because of this health scare and being banned from leaving his house, Moore had to cancel all previously scheduled appearances on late-night talk shows, etc. So, he is calling on his fans to help spread the word about his new film in his absence.

"I need you to be part of a quickly cobbled-together 'army' of grassroots 'ambassadors' who can do the work I was going to do this week to let people know abut the movie and convince as many as possible to go see it," Moore writes.

Moore knows he's asking a lot of folks, because no one has seen it yet. So, he is hoping they trust him based on his past works. He assures his followers that he is so confident in Where To Invade Next that he believes it will "have a huge impact on the elections this year." 

In this latest film, Moore "invades" several foreign countries and describes why they are so much better than America -- that backwoods, capitalistic, cesspool where everybody has to pay for stuff. But don't take our word for it:

The truth is, all these great “ideas” – free universal health care, free university, free day care, taxing and policing hedge fund millionaires – have already happened in nearly every other industrialized country in the world! And I have the evidence – and the film — to prove it! Throughout “Where To Invade Next”, I invade a whole bunch of nefarious countries, from Slovenia to Germany to France to Norway, and pry loose from them the tools they’ve been using to make their countries happy, shiny places. 

My goal: to show millions of Americans what these countries have been hiding from us so we can catch up and be #1 again! Remember “WE’RE #1!!”? Don’t you miss being #1 and waving those big foam #1 fingers at patriotic rallies? In my invasions, I don’t use any weapons, and no one gets droned. I show how to actually make all universities free (and great); how to give all workers five to eight weeks PAID vacation (which increases productivity and betters the economy); how simple and easy it is to give mothers (or fathers) up to a year of PAID maternity leave (which in turn benefits the company overall); how in the societies where woman have achieved true equality and power, everything just seems to get better for everyone; how to reduce the crime rate by ending the war on drugs and having a humane prison system (our recidivism rate is as high as 80%; theirs is 20%); how the economy bounces back faster and is safer when bankers are put in prison; how students in countries without standardized tests and needless homework perform better than our students (and that countries which have more arts and music in their schools do better in math and science)… and on and on and on. 

By the end of the movie, you’ll want to go live in one of those countries. But instead, I’ll show you how we can make all of that happen right here in the USA, right now.
 

Still not convinced that Moore is on to something? Here's the trailer, in which he states, "The American Dream seems to be alive and well everywhere but America:"

 

 

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