Judicial Watch: Deep State Bureaucrats Using Encrypted Messages to Subvert Trump

It’s time to weed out this corruption.

The government watchdog group Judicial Watch (JW) is currently suing the Environmental Protection Agency to release communications within the agency to expose an undercurrent of anti-Trump bureaucrats who want to thwart the president’s policies.

In February, Politico reported, “Federal employees worried that President Donald Trump will gut their agencies are creating new email addresses, signing up for encrypted messaging apps and looking for other, protected ways to push back against the new administration’s agenda.”

The report continued:

Whether inside the Environmental Protection Agency, within the Foreign Service, on the edges of the Labor Department or beyond, employees are using new technology as well as more old-fashioned approaches — such as private face-to-face meetings — to organize letters, talk strategy, or contact media outlets and other groups to express their dissent.

The goal is to get their message across while not violating any rules covering workplace communications, which can be monitored by the government and could potentially get them fired.

In an April 14 press release, JW announced its lawsuit going after “The administrative deep state – the legions of unelected, entrenched bureaucrats in Washington” which “thinks it doesn’t have to answer to an elected president, the rule of law, or the American people.”

A Freedom of Information Act lawsuit has been filed to expose if EPA officials have used a cell phone encryption app called Signal since Trump’s inauguration “to thwart government oversight and transparency.”

“Given EPA’s checkered history on records retention and transparency, it is disturbing to see reports that career civil servants and appointed officials may now be attempting to use high-tech blocking devices to circumvent the Federal Records Act and the Freedom of Information Act altogether,” JW states.

Photo credit: Visual Content via Foter.com / CC BY

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