Jordan's King Abdullah: This Is a War 'Within Islam'

He can admit it, but POTUS can't.

President Obama, Secretary of State John Kerry and Democratic presidential frontrunner Hillary Clinton can't bring themselves to publicly acknowledge that Islam and  "Muslims" are inextricably linked to terrorism. Remarkably, however, one Muslim world leader has no problem in speaking openly about the war "within Islam."

Speaking at a press conference in Kosovo Tuesday, Jordan's King Abdullah admonished that we are about to enter a "Third World War" if the civilized world does not "act fast to tackle" ISIS and other interconnected terrorist threats. 

"We are facing a Third World War against humanity and this is what brings us all altogether," he said. "The atrocious Paris attacks shows that scourge of terrorism can strike anywhere and any time." 

While King Abdullah has previously stated that terrorists twist his faith to suit their genocidal agenda, he has also been open in admitting that terrorism is an Islamic problem and thus it is incumbent upon Muslims to deal with it. 

"This is a war, as I said, repeatedly within Islam and unfortunately over 100,000 Muslims have been murdered by Daesh (an Arabic acronym for the Islamic State) alone over the past two years, and that doesn't also count for the atrocities like-minded groups have also done in Africa and Asia."

AFP reported that on Sunday King Abdullah vowed to remain on the frontlines of the fight against ISIS because it is "our fight as Muslims."

The Hashemite King has before shown resolve in the fight against ISIS. Recall his response earlier this year after an ISIS video surfaced showing the brutal execution of a Royal Jordanian Air Force pilot. King Abdallah's vow of retribution and to fight the Islamic State physically himself, won over many fans the across the world.

Jordan, part of the U.S.-led coalition against ISIS, has thus far taken in its share of Syrian refugees as well, though there are disputes as to the total number, which ranges between 600,000 and 1.4 million.

 

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