IRS Relinquishes: Slowly Begins Approving Tea Party Tax-Exempt Applications

VERY slowly.

It’s nothing short of criminal the way the IRS has been treating conservative groups seeking tax-exempt status. Federal courts have found that the practice hasn’t slowed and discovered that the tax agency actively buried applications from tea party groups, something they didn’t do with leftist organizations. This mounting pressure has led the IRS to begin finally processing the applications.

It took them long enough. Some of the applications have been in the system for seven years, as is the case with the Albuquerque Tea Party, which filed in 2009. The Texas Patriots Tea Party have been waiting for at least four years. The group just received word from the Justice Department that their application will finally go through, but it didn’t say how long the process would take. 

However, even with the announcement that outstanding applications will begin to go through the system, frustrations remain. According to The Washington Times, DoJ attorneys are referring all questions to the department’s press office, which in turn, refers all questions to the IRS. Of course, the IRS isn’t talking because the cases are ongoing. And so the deadly cycle of a bloated government continues. 

The IRS has yet to offer an acceptable reason for targeting conservative groups, often citing “confusion” on how to proceed because of previous Supreme Court decisions. In the case of the Texas Patriot Tea Party, the IRS blamed the scrutiny on the name being too similar to a political action committee and perceived the PAC was “stepping too far over the line on political activities,” reports the Times.

But even though the IRS is slowly — and we mean SLOWLY — relinquishing, the scandal isn’t going away anytime soon. Commissioner John Koskinen is being called out for impeachment over this and the e-mail impropriety involving former IRS executive Lois Lerner. Moreover, the corruption the federal courts have found goes all the way up to top IRS brass in Washington D.C., just short of the White House. 

At least, that’s what we know so far.

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