Human Rights Org Places U.S. In 'Hall of Shame' for Christian Persecution

"Worrying Trends"

International Christian Concern (ICC) has placed the United States on its 2016 Hall of Shame for its persecution of Christians

Though the report clearly makes a distinction between the U.S. and despotic hellholes like North Korea, the ICC notes that the sharp decline of religious freedom in such a short period of time should be alarming to those concerned. 

The three categories for classification were "Worst of the Worst," "Core Countries" and "New and Noteworthy." Syria, North Korea and Nigeria, naturally, made the worst list given the mass murder and violent persecution of Christians in those countries. The U.S. made the cut for "New and Noteworthy" for having Christians face "constant attacks in the media, where they are portrayed as bigoted, racist, sexist and closed-minded."

Citing the most prominent cases like the Sweet Cakes by Melissa controversy in Southern Oregon, the report made a special case of the Orlando gay nightclub shooting in June 2016 when a Muslim gay man killed 49 people, citing how LGBTQ forces used Christians as scapegoats by accusing them of fostering a culture that made the attacks possible. 

"Anti-Christian entities have been able to leverage the growing secularization of society and culture to their advantage, utilizing the courts as a preferred venue to gradually marginalize and silence Christians," said the report. "Using the cudgel of 'equality,' secular forces in and out of the courts have worked to create a body of law built from one bad precedent after another."

"While there is no comparison between the life of a Christian in the US with persecuted believers overseas, ICC sees these worrying trends as an alarming indication of a decline in religious liberty in the United States," the report concluded. 

Of course, this report means nothing when compared to the horrible persecution, vilification, and hatred directed towards Hollywood celebrities, according to actress Meryl Streep. 

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