Hamas Commander Killed by His Own Over Allegations of Theft, Gay Sex

Big no-no's to the terrorist group.

In an ironic twist of fate, a revered Hamas commander, Mahmoud Ishtiwi, was recently executed by his own. Did he betray his Hamas brethren and help Israel? No. Did he fail to lead successful terror operations? No. Rather, Ishtiwi stole funds and, worse still, was alleged to have engaged in gay sex acts. And that latter one is a big no-no for the terrorist group. 

The New York Times actually covered the story, thus leveling an array of implications about Palestinian human rights and Hamas terror, yet the outlet could not even bring itself to label Hamas a terror group even though it is officially designated as such. Even when writing on the execution of gays, the liberal media can't seem to shake their Islamophobia-phobia. 

Below are relevant excerpts from the Times' report on a case that "had all the trappings of a telenovela: sex, torture and embezzlement in Gaza’s most venerated and secretive institution, the armed wing of Hamas": 

Mr. Ishtiwi, 34, was a commander from a storied family of Hamas loyalists who, during the 2014 war with Israel, was responsible for 1,000 fighters and a network of attack tunnels. Last month, his former comrades executed him with three bullets to the chest.

Adding a layer of scandal to the story, he was accused of moral turpitude, by which Hamas meant homosexuality. And there were whispers that he had carved the word “zulum” — wronged — into his body in a desperate kind of last testament.

His death has become the talk of the town in the conservative quarters of Gaza, the Palestinian coastal territory, endlessly discussed in living rooms, at checkpoints and in cabs. But to astute Gaza observers, this was more substantive than a soap opera.

Mr. Ishtiwi, who is survived by two wives and three children, was not the first member of Hamas’s armed wing, the Izzedine al-Qassam Brigades, to be killed by his own. What was unprecedented was the way his relatives spoke out publicly about it.

Ishtiwi's family has, until now, been treated as Hamas royalty due to its long history sheltering leaders wanted for crimes by Israel. Still, its standing was disregarded when Ishtiwi's mother pleaded for her son's release: 

The family was considered Hamas royalty for having sheltered leaders wanted by Israel, including Mohammed Deif, the Qassam commander in chief lionized by Palestinians. Mr. Ishtiwi’s mother even sent Mr. Deif, who has lost an eye and limbs but has survived repeated assassination attempts by Israel, a tearful video message in which she entreated him to release her son.

Ibrahim al-Madhoun, a writer close to Hamas, the Islamist group that controls Gaza, said the situation spotlighted shifts since Yehya Sinwar was elected in 2012 to represent Qassam in Hamas’s political wing, a role akin to defense minister. Mr. Sinwar’s actions, he said, showed that even senior figures were not sacrosanct.

“He is harsher than other leaders — he wants his army to be pure,” Mr. Madhoun said in an interview. “Those who are in the Qassam are the most important people in Gaza. There is a need, they say, to show that these people are not untouchable.”

How anyone can attempt to legitimize Hamas or entertain the possibility of a so-called Palestinian state while it's under the terrorist organization's thumb is beyond comprehension. But then again, the Left never has been rational when it comes to its hatred of Israel. 

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