Fournier: We Were ‘Naïve’ to Defend Obamacare

"It's getting difficult and slinking toward impossible to defend the Affordable Care Act."

Ron Fournier

National Journal​'s Ron Fournier is finding his excuses for President Obama’s signature legislative achievement rapidly running out, admitting that he was “naïve” to believe in the value of the law. The latest devastating announcement from the administration: the obviously politically motivated decision to—for the second time in a year—exempt select businesses from having to offer healthcare to full-timers. “Not coincidentally, the delays punt implementation beyond congressional elections in November...”

Fournier begins his piece by reluctantly admitting he is close to throwing in the towel on the increasingly troubling, and revealing, implementation of Obamacare, lumping himself into the group of "naïve columnists" who trusted the administration.

It's getting difficult and slinking toward impossible to defend the Affordable Care Act. The latest blow to Democratic candidates, liberal activists, and naïve columnists like me came Monday from the White House, which announced yet another delay in the Obamacare implementation.

The delay applies to those companies with 50 to 99 employees, allowing them until 2016 to comply, which as Fournier points out is “two years longer than required by law.” For the next year, larger companies will not have to insure as many employees as required in the law. Fournier argues that the 2016 date tips the administration’s hand.

Not coincidentally, the delays punt implementation beyond congressional elections in November, which raises the first problem with defending Obamacare: The White House has politicized its signature policy.

This follows the trend of disingenuous promotion and rollout of the law, a pattern that is making it near “impossible” for even a “naïve” Obama apologist like Fournier to defend:

The win-at-all-cost mentality helped create a culture in which a partisan-line vote was deemed sufficient for passing transcendent legislation. It spurred advisers to develop a dishonest talking point—"If you like your health plan, you'll be able to keep your health plan." And political expediency led Obama to repeat the line, over and over and over again, when he knew, or should have known, it was false.

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