Comey Initially Described Hillary’s Handling of Top-Secret E-Mails ‘Grossly Negligent'

That would’ve paved the path for actual charges. But nooooo!

New memos show that former FBI Director James Comey used the strong language “grossly negligent” in early drafts of his statement when describing how Hillary Clinton handled top-secret e-mails while serving as secretary of state. However, the phrase was deleted by the time his statement went public.

According to The Washington Times:

Sen. Charles E. Grassley, chairman of the Judiciary Committee, demanded the FBI detail why Mr. Comey nixed that phrase in later drafts.

Gross negligence would seem to be a high enough standard to have prosecuted Mrs. Clinton — though Mr. Comey ended up not recommending charges, saying that while the former first lady, senator and top diplomat was clueless, he couldn’t prove she knew how badly she was risking national security.

Comey’s original draft stated there was “evidence to support a conclusion that Secretary Clinton, and others, used the private email server in a manner that was grossly negligent with respect to the handling of classified material.” And also, “[T]he sheer volume of information that was properly classified as Secret at the time it was discussed on email (that is, excluding the ‘up classified’ emails) supports an inference that the participants were grossly negligent in their handling of that information.”

The final version stated: “Although we did not find clear evidence that Secretary Clinton or her colleagues intended to violate laws governing the handling of classified information, there is evidence that they were extremely careless in their handling of very sensitive, highly classified information.”

At the same time that Comey was dumbing down the language to avoid charges, he was also drafting an exoneration of Clinton long before a final verdict was reached about her using a private e-mail server to conduct government business. 

Collusion, corruption, Clinton, and Comey — seems to be a lot in common, there.

Issues

People

Organizations