AG Nominee Lynch: Illegal Immigrants Have Right to Work in US

"I believe that the right and obligation to work is shared by everyone in this country, regardless of how they came here."

President Barack Obama's nominee for Attorney General, Loretta Lynch, believes illegal aliens have the "right to work" in America, violating multiple federal crimes in the process. 

The revelation came during her first day of confirmation hearings Wednesday on Capitol Hill. Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-AL) asked Lynch about her position on enforcing America's immigration laws:  

Sessions: The president's action would give people who came here unlawfully the right to work, participate in social security and medicare, when Congress has not done that, allows them to stay for at least a period lawfully. Let me ask you, in the workplace of America today when we have a high number of unemployed, we have had declining wages for many years, the lowest percentage of Americans working, who has more right to a job in this country? A lawful immigrant who is here -- a green card holder -- or a citizen, or someone who came here illegally. 

Lynch: Senator, I believe that the right and obligation to work is shared by everyone in this country, regardless of how they came here. When one is here, regardless of status, I would prefer they be participating in the workplace than not be.

On his YouTube page, Sen. Sessions extrapolates on the issue and his concern over the position held by the nominee to be the nation's top law enforcement officer and the President's actions with regard to providing legal amnesty to those who have crossed the borders and stayed in America in violation of federal law:  

In addition to suspending enforcement for nearly all of the 12 million individuals unlawfully present in the United States, President Obama issued an executive decree on November 20th, 2014, extending work permits, Social Security, Medicare, tax credits, and government identification to 5 million illegal immigrants and illegal visa violators. This would allow illegal immigrants to take any job in America, regardless of chronic high unemployment for Americans—including a 10.4 percent unemployment rate for African-American workers. Peter Kirsanow, a member of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, explained—contra AG Holder’s “breathtaking” contention that amnesty was a civil right—that unlawful amnesty for illegal immigrants violated the rights of U.S. citizens to the full protection of their laws, including those laws passed by Congress to protect their jobs and wages from illegal competition. The President’s executive edict (an edict he said previously only an Emperor would deign to issue) voids Americans’ legal protections in law, supplanting them with a new executive policy that Congress and voters have rejected, a policy which forces unemployed Americans to compete against a large and growing illegal workforce.

Following the confirmation hearing, Sessions released a statement saying he could not support Lynch's nomination and would vote "no" onher confirmation due to her position on illegal immigration.  “Unfortunately, when asked today whether she found the president’s actions to be ‘legal and constitutional,’ Ms. Lynch said that she did,” Sessions said. “I therefore am unable to support her nomination.”

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